Overview

Historical changes requests to the Vector Transmission Code (now the Gas Transmission Code) where Gas Industry Co previously had a role in considering appeals from the change process under the VTC.

On 20 April 2016 Vector Gas Limited – owner of the Vector transmission system – was acquired by First State Funds, two infrastructure funds managed by First State Investments, known in Australia as Colonial First State Global Asset Management. Vector Gas Limited was renamed First Gas Limited (First Gas).

Then, on 15 June 2016, First Gas purchased the Maui pipeline from Shell, Todd and OMV (collectively known as the Maui Mining Companies). As the single owner, First Gas, now wishes to converge the operations of the Maui and Vector pipelines, including the transmission access regimes and their respective codes – the Maui Pipeline Operating Code (MPOC) and the Vector Transmission Code (VTC). Until that occurs these codes remain in effect.

The Vector Transmission Code (VTC) sets out the multilateral terms of access to the transmission pipelines previously owned by Vector Gas Limited. Although not a party to the VTC, Gas Industry Co originally had a role in considering VTC Change Request appeals. However, a change to the VTC amendment process was introduced on 1 April 2015 (having obtained the necessary support from Vector and its shippers), which reshaped the amendment process, including removing the right of appeal to Gas Industry Co.

From 1 April 2015 amendments to the VTC occur under this new process. Some background on how the change came about, and information on the old and new amendment processes is provided in the Background section. Also provided in the Background section are details of all the VTC code change appeals Gas Industry Co considered before that date.

 

Current Arrangements

First Gas aims to replace the MPOC and VTC with a new Gas Transmission Access Code (GTAC) on 1 October 2020. The GTAC will have a new set of code change arrangements in which Gas Industry Co has a role. Information about our role under these new arrangements can be found here.  In the meantime the current VTC can be found here.

Gas Industry Co is no longer involved in the VTC code change process.

Archived

An industry group was established in 2013 to progress the recommendations of a Panel of Expert Advisers (PEA) in respect of the Gas Transmission Investment Programme (GTIP). The group was originally known as the Gas Industry Experts Working Group (GIEWG) and latterly as the Gas Industry Transmission Access Working Group (GITAWG). The GIEWG developed a work programme that included a set of VTC changes one of which was to change the code change process itself. The aim was to consolidate the lessons learned from past code changes, and to introduce a more ‘collaborative approach’.

Since the VTC was introduced in 2007, parties could (and often did) change the code without Gas Industry Co’s involvement. Gas Industry Co only became involved when one of the parties appealed a decision to make (or not to make) a proposed code change. However, recognising the special nature of the proposed change to the VTC’s amendment process, the GIEWG decided to seek Gas Industry Co’s views on the proposal, as well as the views of other stakeholders. On 19 November 2014 the GIEWG sent Gas Industry Co an early copy of the proposed change, still subject to final drafting comments from Shippers.

Gas Industry Co provided favourable comments to the GIEWG on 18 December 2014. That letter and the proposed change to the change request can be found below in Related Documents, which also includes the 1 April 2015 VTC which incorporates the new process and GITAWGs Quarterly Report to 31 December 2014 which discusses the group's progress.

 

Key Areas

The Vector Transmission Code (VTC) sets out the multilateral terms of access to Vector’s transmission pipelines. Although not a party to the VTC, Gas Industry Co originally had a role in considering VTC Change Request appeals. However, a change to the VTC amendment process was introduced on 1 April 2015 (having obtained the necessary support from Vector and its shippers), which reshaped the amendment process, including removing the right of appeal to Gas Industry Co.

Under the re-designed process, notice of a proposed change to the VTC is first published in outline form on the Open Access Transmission Information System (OATIS).  A consultation process then occurs, before Vector shippers vote on the proposal.  Gas Industry Co and other non-VTC stakeholders have an option to provide input during the consultation process

Related Information

VTC Change Request: Gas Transfer Agreement Timing Changes - 28 August 2015
VTC Change Request: VTC Extension 2015 - 5 August 2015
VTC Change Request: Congestion Management - 1 May 2015
Change to the VTC Change Request process 1 April 2015

Prior to the introduction of a new process for VTC changes, introduced in April 2015 the original process for VTC changes provided that the VTC could be changed if Vector and 75% of the shippers who voted on the proposed change agreed to it.  Within 5 business days of voting on a change, Vector or any shipper could lodge an appeal to GIC to seek to have the change allowed or disallowed.  If that occurred, Gas Industry Co would consult on the matter and determine whether or not the change should proceed.

All VTC Change Request Appeals under this process can be found in the left hand navigation.

Related Information

VTC Change Request Appeal 31 May 2013 (Single Issue)
VTC Change Request Appeal 27 November 2012 (Balancing)
VTC Change Request Appeal 31 July 2012 (Prudentials and Disputes) [WITHDRAWN]
VTC Change Request Appeal 14 December 2011 (Invoicing)
VTC Change Request Appeal 20 February 2009 (BPP Account Overdraft)
VTC Change Request Appeal 12 December 2008 (Daily Metering Data)
VTC Change Request Appeal 9 October 2008 (Multiple Issues)

Related Documents

  • 20141218 Letter re: VTC code change process
    173 KB Adobe Acrobat PDF file
  • 141106 Change Request Process
    70 KB Adobe Acrobat PDF file
  • VTC Effective 1 April 2015
    1.2 MB Adobe Acrobat PDF file

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